Mary

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I pushed my wool-clad feet smoothly into the warm boots I had left sitting on the radiator. It was a familiar feeling, this trudging out to the barn in the dark, one I’d had many times before. As I slipped in through the part-way open barn door I could see the shadow of my dad, “Morning, Mary,” at work with Daisy. I walked over and gave her a quick nuzzle on her soft nose. Then Patsy reminded me with her whining moo that I was needed at her side. Pulling my stool up next to her round tummy I began my daily routine. As the warm milk hit the cold pail, steam rose up to my chilly hands and Patsy turned her head around to give me a nod and once more a deep moo, this time in thanks. I rested my head into her furry side and began to think about another Mary. Another Mary, in another time and place.

She, also, was in a barn, although not a familiar one. She had never imagined herself here, never in all of her 14 years would she have seen herself here, with Joseph. The trip had been a long one. Joseph had taken care of her the whole way. How could she ever have doubted him? But now, tonight, now of all nights, this baby had decided to come.

The angel had told her what would happen, but still, all of this was so new. Talking to Elizabeth had helped. Even with the difference in their ages they had a lot to ask each other, a lot to tell each other. The angel had apparently come to see Elizabeth also, because when Mary had first arrived Elizabeth had hugged her with a knowing…that Mary was carrying the Savior.

And now, here she was, lying in the hay, with the cows close by giving off their sweet warm breath and she, Mary, giving birth to the long-awaited for Lord. In the midst of the pain, her soul was at once peaceful… and honored… and humbled that God would choose her to bring mercy to His People. And yet He had.

Pam Mckee

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A Day Which Will Live in Infamy

“…a day which will live in infamy.” This now famous turn of phrase was spoken by President Franklin Roosevelt 74 years ago on December 8, 1941 the day after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. The link below will take you to an amazing story. It’s long, but well worth reading. This article first appear in the armed forces newspaper “Stars and Stripes” in 2008 and appeared again in 2014 in “World Magazine.” It’s about Mitsuo Fuchida a Japanese pilot who led the surprise attack on the American fleet, as it lie at anchor in Pearl Harbor. It’s an amazing story of the kind of peace that only the Christ of Christmas can bring to the human heart!

http://worldmag.com/2014/12/from_tora_tora_tora_to_giving_god_the_glory/page1

Jim Mckee